So here I am. Chile!

So here I am. Chile!

3
Mar 24

Travel Blog "Everything Everywhere" names Argentina world's #2 Food country
Mar 22

rueaugereau said: Love this. Absolutely love it! I'm going to Buenos Aires this summer.
When I have time I'm going to look at all your adventures. :)

Thanks! You have a lot to look forward to this summer. Let me know if you’re wondering about anything. Bs As is an awesome place that offers almost anything, but there are a few things that can get tricky.

Mar 22

Bariloche: Day One
4
Mar 21

Yesterday, I went to mass with my host family and to get a first hand experience with Argentina’s official religion: Catholicism. In the evening, I went to the neighborhood of La Boca to experience it’s unofficial religion: football.
The sun went down around the time we got there making it a perfect scene. Argentina is one of the most football-crazed countries in the world, and their strong showing in last year’s World Cup was just a glimpse of the amount of skill found here. I’ve never been much of a football player, myself. Over here, everyone constantly appears to be training for a football match. A day at the park will typically lead you to encounter a chain of joggers, people pushing themselves to full capacity, skaters, and a football match. Parks back home have a handful of joggers, but these parks are like gyms, they have like a 90% workout ratio.
I live in Belgrano, mostly River territory, and River is La Boca’s big rival. The neighborhood of La Boca is interesting itself. It’s one of the lesser ideal areas in town to be around late at night, or in the day for that matter. It’s a place that’s seen better days. Now, it hosts “El Caminito” a popular tourist attraction, the stadium, and the rest is sadly poverty. That gives the Boca Juniors football team a bit of a rougher, down and out spirit. Think Raiders.
I was sitting in what I soon realized was the foreigner section. I was sitting next to two Germans and a Swedish girl. Our program, who I went with, hired external security, because of what typically goes on in the stands at these football games. I was expecting a fleet of bodyguards, which would’ve been a fun experience, but instead I got these two guys who get paid to watch football games and eat pizza with foreigners. It was a fun experience anyways. I soon discovered the other part of the stadium, the stands directly across, were the place you would want a security guard. On that side, a band played nonstop, as fans waved their banners, flags, and beach umbrellas with gusto.
The game itself was a fun one to watch. I didn’t have much rooting interest, and Olympia ended up winning, 2-0. Partway through, a big injury happened on the field, but I missed how it all went down. Boca played decently, but not that well. They had a lot of good drives, but each time it would be one mistake that would blow an otherwise perfect opportunity.
I enjoy watching football, so I had a great time. Even if I didn’t care for the game, though, I imagine I would’ve liked it. The area of La Boca, as gritty as it is, does have a lot of life. The stadium atmosphere was so energetic, it was like being in a tin box of enthusiasm. Outside, vendors sold very cheap and good empanadas, as well as cheap jerseys, which were all probably fake.

Yesterday, I went to mass with my host family and to get a first hand experience with Argentina’s official religion: Catholicism. In the evening, I went to the neighborhood of La Boca to experience it’s unofficial religion: football.

The sun went down around the time we got there making it a perfect scene. Argentina is one of the most football-crazed countries in the world, and their strong showing in last year’s World Cup was just a glimpse of the amount of skill found here. I’ve never been much of a football player, myself. Over here, everyone constantly appears to be training for a football match. A day at the park will typically lead you to encounter a chain of joggers, people pushing themselves to full capacity, skaters, and a football match. Parks back home have a handful of joggers, but these parks are like gyms, they have like a 90% workout ratio.

I live in Belgrano, mostly River territory, and River is La Boca’s big rival. The neighborhood of La Boca is interesting itself. It’s one of the lesser ideal areas in town to be around late at night, or in the day for that matter. It’s a place that’s seen better days. Now, it hosts “El Caminito” a popular tourist attraction, the stadium, and the rest is sadly poverty. That gives the Boca Juniors football team a bit of a rougher, down and out spirit. Think Raiders.

I was sitting in what I soon realized was the foreigner section. I was sitting next to two Germans and a Swedish girl. Our program, who I went with, hired external security, because of what typically goes on in the stands at these football games. I was expecting a fleet of bodyguards, which would’ve been a fun experience, but instead I got these two guys who get paid to watch football games and eat pizza with foreigners. It was a fun experience anyways. I soon discovered the other part of the stadium, the stands directly across, were the place you would want a security guard. On that side, a band played nonstop, as fans waved their banners, flags, and beach umbrellas with gusto.

The game itself was a fun one to watch. I didn’t have much rooting interest, and Olympia ended up winning, 2-0. Partway through, a big injury happened on the field, but I missed how it all went down. Boca played decently, but not that well. They had a lot of good drives, but each time it would be one mistake that would blow an otherwise perfect opportunity.

I enjoy watching football, so I had a great time. Even if I didn’t care for the game, though, I imagine I would’ve liked it. The area of La Boca, as gritty as it is, does have a lot of life. The stadium atmosphere was so energetic, it was like being in a tin box of enthusiasm. Outside, vendors sold very cheap and good empanadas, as well as cheap jerseys, which were all probably fake.

Mar 21

This is what I mean when I say my school’s new location looks a lot like it could be a part of Hogwarts.
philippelazaro

This is what I mean when I say my school’s new location looks a lot like it could be a part of Hogwarts.

philippelazaro

4
Mar 21

Breaking the Hiatus

It’s been a little while since I’ve posted here. That probably has to do with the fact that I can’t remember my password for this blog off the top of my head, so when I was traveling, I couldn’t access it from the hostel’s computer. I did manage to make posts from my regular blog, though. To make up for it, I’ll be posting more actively, and I’ll be re-posting up the things I wrote while in Bariloche and Mendoza.

Argentine life continues to carry on well here. I’ve been here for over two months now, and I’m getting as cozy as halfway-through-the-whole-thing should feel like. I recently hit the “clicking point” where I feel really comfortable with my Spanish, and like I could legitimately express whatever I wanted with a satisfying level of accuracy. It’s still a long ways from being perfect, but being able to communicate effectively is still cause for celebration. I’m looking forward to becoming able to speak more naturally, without having to think consciously too hard.

The second half of classes have started up. We’ve changed campuses and my new location seriously looks like it could be a wing of Hogwarts. It’s actually a converted former mansion, and it looks the part. Stained glass, marble staircases, the works. I no longer walk two blocks to school, but I take a ride on the city bus and walk six blocks. It’s actually a nice journey, one I’m accustomed to now, and that I look forward to.

I just dropped off my laundry at the lavenderia. It was my last chance to do so before leaving for Chile on Wednesday.

Mar 21

philippelazaro:

Salmon salad from that wonderful place, Tea Connection.

philippelazaro:

Salmon salad from that wonderful place, Tea Connection.

4
Mar 01

So this is how Argentines graduate. On their last day of school, they assault each other with all twelve aisles of the grocery store right in front of the school. Street cleaners stood by to do damage repair. Flour, tea, chocolate syrup, ketchup, and blue milkshakey things were just some of the parties involved. Needless to say, it was wild, foam flew everywhere, and everyone got messy.

I saw this happening and new I had to do something. It was so chaotic, so I did the only thing I knew how to do and started running everywhere with my camera, trying to capture it all while avoiding the sludge. Somehow, a 365 project trained me well in ninja photography. I didn’t get much more than a few drops of foam on my forearm, and wound up with a ton of awesome pictures of all the madness. I used the students onlooking family members as human shields, adjusted my zoom on the fly, and felt like I was doing something photojournalistic.

I celebrated my high school graduation a similar way, but with only a few food products, like whipped and shaving cream, chocolate fudge, and sparkling cider. It wasn’t nearly as crazy and I didn’t get anywhere near as messy.

1
Feb 27

philippelazaro:


El Ateneo
One of Buenos Aires’ treasures is this gorgeous theatre-turned-bookstore.

philippelazaro:

El Ateneo

One of Buenos Aires’ treasures is this gorgeous theatre-turned-bookstore.

4
Feb 27